Discover the Great British Silver Queens Beasts

  • The silver dollar was minted in the United States in the early 1850s.
  • The U.S. silver dollar was minted between 1854 and 1889, first with 90% silver and then with 40% silver.
  • The silver dollar was minted in the United States between 1854 and 1889, first with 90% silver and then with 40% silver.

The Royal Mint struck its first silver coins in 1489. The coins were known as "groats." In 1588, Queen Elizabeth I granted the Royal Mint the right to coin silver any denomination and call it "silver." The coins were called "Elizabeth Groats."



Free Gold IRA kit

The Queen's Beasts

In 1953, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II commissioned the Royal Mint to produce a series of gold, silver, and platinum coins featuring a variety of beasts representing England's historical monarchs. The coins were designed and sculpted by Royal Mint engravers, and are produced annually, although only the silver releases are popular today.
The Queen's Beasts series has grown to include silver, gold, and platinum coins, as well as three commemorative gold and silver coins. The coins depict legendary British and Irish animals, including the lion, griffin, unicorn, wyvern, heraldic eagle, dragon, and polar bear. The Queen's Beasts series ranks among the most recognizable coin series in the world.

The Falcon of the Plantagenets

This sterling silver falcon is 6.1 inches (15.9 cm) tall and weighs 1.3 ounces (37.9 g). The falcon holds an egg in its talons, symbolizing victory. The royal falconer George of Clarence was said to have tamed this bird.
Unicorn of Scotland
This sterling silver unicorn is 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) tall and weighs 0.6 ounce (16 g). The unicorn was a symbol of Scotland. The unicorn's head was mounted on the Royal Standard of Scotland that was used in the coronation of James IV and later in the coronation of James V.
Lion of England
This sterling silver lion is 3.6 inches (9.1 cm) tall and weighs 0.5 ounce (14 g). The lion is a symbol of England. This lion was a gift from King Richard the Lionheart to the citizens of London. It was used for many coronations and was especially popular with Henry VII.
Griffin of Scotland
This sterling silver griffin is 3.2 inches (8 cm) tall and weighs 0.7 ounce (20 g). The griffin is a symbol of Scotland. This griffin is found on the Royal Standard of Scotland. It was used at the coronation of James IV and was a favorite of James V.
Dragon of Wales
This sterling silver dragon is 4 inches (10 cm) tall and weighs 0.6 ounce (16 g). The dragon is a symbol of Wales. This dragon is used by the Welsh guards during state visits.
Lion of Edward I
This sterling silver lion is 3.2 inches (8.1 cm) tall and weighs 0.8 ounce (25 g). The lion is a symbol of England. This lion was used at the coronation of Edward I and has been used at many coronations since.

See also  American Heart for Gold Offers a Safe Way to Invest Your Retirement

great britain silver queens beasts

The Lion of England

The Lion of England is one of the most well-known of the Queen's Beasts, and is one of the most intricately designed. The Lion of England is said to represent England's strength. The lion's mane is parted in the middle, symbolizing England's division into shires, or counties. The lion holds a lion's paw in its right paw, symbolizing England's traditional status as a "king of kings." The lion's right forepaw is raised, representing England's position as a center of trade and industry.
The Unicorn of Scotland
The Unicorn of Scotland is the eighth coin of the Queen's Beasts series. As a mythical creature, it is symbolic of the Scottish people's strength and exclusivity. The unicorn's horn is curved, symbolizing Scotland's geographic curve from north to south. The unicorn's tail is bent three times, symbolizing Scotland's three kingdoms: Scotland, Strathclyde, and Lothian.
The Dragon of Wales
The dragon of Wales is the third coin of the Queen's Beasts series. The dragon's head is adorned with a crown, symbolizing Wales' status as a kingdom. The dragon's tail is wrapped around its body, symbolizing Wales' incorporation into Great Britain. The dragon's claws are extended, representing Wales' role as a place of strength.
The Unicorn of England
The Unicorn of England is the second coin of the Queen's Beasts series. The unicorn's horn is ringed, symbolizing England's position as an island. The unicorn's neck is marked with a cross, symbolizing England's Christianity. The unicorn's body is serpentine, symbolizing England's twisted shape.

The Dragon of Wales

The Welsh dragon is a representation of a mythological beast. The legend of the dragon of Wales tells of a creature that was the guardian of the legendary sword of King Arthur. The dragon is represented as having wings, a barbed tongue, and claws. It is depicted on the reverse of the British Silver Queen stock of 1953-2002.
The Lion of England
The Lion of England is England's national emblem. The lion is adorned with a crown, and is portrayed as having a lion's head with a mane and a human body. This creature is depicted on the reverse of the British Silver Queen stock of 2002-2021.
The Unicorn of Scotland
The unicorn is the national animal of Scotland. The unicorn is depicted on the reverse of the British Silver Queen stock of 2021-2032.
The Griffin of Edward I
The griffin represents Edward I. The griffin's representation on the reverse of the British Silver Queen stock depicts three griffins, with wings, and wearing crowns.